Intermediate Tutorials

Create Facebook 3D Posts using 3D Objects from Cinema 4D

In this tutorial, learn how to create 3D Facebook Posts with 3D objects exported from Cinema 4D. By creating 3D posts on Facebook, users are able to move and rotate an object in full 3D.

When using Cinema 4D, to start, export your 3D object as an OBJ. Once you have an OBJ and the accompanying MTL file, you need to convert those to the GLB file format, which is what Facebook currently uses for 3D posts.

To convert the OBJ to a GLB file, use this website: http://52.4.31.236/convertmodel.html

Check out Facebook’s developer tutorials on 3D posts here: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/...


Want to make Lighting & Reflections in Cinema 4D a snap?

Take a look at 360° Environment Maps Pro for Cinema 4D & Cinema 4D Lite to quickly and easily add lighting and rendering options to your scene. You can also save over 25% on bundle packs!


Looking to create 3D photos using portrait mode on your iPhone and Adobe Photoshop? Check out this quick video below!

To see more features of Cinema 4D, be sure to check out new features in Cinema 4D R18.

• Top 5 MoGraph updates and new Effectors for R18
• Voronoi Fracture, a New MoGraph Feature
• Inverted Ambient Occlusion
• Working with the new Thinfilm Shader
• How to use the new Parallax Bump Map Feature
• Using the new Shadow Catcher for 3D Compositing
• Working with the new Substance Materials Workflow

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Create Facebook 3D Photos using Photoshop and an iPhone

In this tutorial, learn how to create 3D Facebook Photos with layered graphics, using Adobe Photoshop, the Depth Cam iPhone app, and Facebook.

By using Portrait Mode on the iPhone, you can upload photos to Facebook and have them appear as 3D photos, creating an eye-catching parallax effect when users scroll through your feed. But did you know you can create them using graphics, photos, and layered images?

Follow these quick steps to create and upload your own 3D photos to Facebook!


Looking to simply create 3D photos using portrait mode on your iPhone? Check out this quick video below!

Want to make Lighting & Reflections in Cinema 4D a snap?

Take a look at 360° Environment Maps Pro for Cinema 4D & Cinema 4D Lite to quickly and easily add lighting and rendering options to your scene. You can also save over 25% on bundle packs!


Want more info on New Features in Photoshop? Learn more about:

• New Layer Styles in Photoshop CC
• Quick Export to PNG and updates to Save for Web

• New 3D Filter to create bump maps and normal maps for 3D

• Working with Creative Cloud Libraries in Photoshop and other Adobe Apps

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


CINEMA 4D R19 - TOP 5 NEW FEATURES

Cinema 4D R19 releases in 2017 with some great new features that greatly build on C4D features used for motion graphics, Visual Effects, and 360 Virtual Reality rendering.

This includes major updates to the Voronoi Fracture, a spherical camera for creating 360 VR scenes, scene reconstruction for help with 3D motion tracking, and more! Check out the video above to learn about my Top 5 new features in Cinema 4D R19!

Fracture 2.0 - Gluing fractured pieces

Viewing Depth of Field in the Viewport!

Scene Reconstruction for 3D Tracking helps you composite 3D elements into live action footage

Custom falloff and gluing for Voronoi Fracture in R19

Adjusting falloff for glued fracture pieces

Using a Spherical Camera for 360 VR Renders

The new Sound Effector creating some Musical Mograph Animation

Voronoi Fracturing combined with MoGraph and Dynamics


Want to make Lighting & Reflections in Cinema 4D a snap?

Take a look at 360° Environment Maps Pro for Cinema 4D & Cinema 4D Lite to quickly and easily add lighting and rendering options to your scene. You can also save over 25% on bundle packs!

To see more new features in Cinema 4D, be sure to check out new features in Cinema 4D R18.

• Top 5 MoGraph updates and new Effectors for R18
• Voronoi Fracture, a New MoGraph Feature
• Inverted Ambient Occlusion
• Working with the new Thinfilm Shader
• How to use the new Parallax Bump Map Feature
• Using the new Shadow Catcher for 3D Compositing
• Working with the new Substance Materials Workflow

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


3D wireframe animations with Cinema 4D & After Effects

In this Cinema 4D & After Effects CC 2017 Tutorial, learn how to create 3D wireframe animations, beginning with Cinema 4D R18 and adding effects in After Effects. By using this technique you can create the 3d wireframe look seen in film and on TV, and create your own 3D object animations with Cinema 4D and After Effects. This technique also utilizes new techniques for After Effects CC 2017 as well as working with Cinema 4D R18 Studio. This After Effects CC 2017 tutorial is also a great stepping stone to get into 3D animation and motion graphics for After Effects users.

Get Cinema 4D products used in this tutorial:

Want learn more about 3D animation in After Effects? Check out these other tutorials

Use Element 3D V2 in After Effects to create a 3D Logo

Create a 3D extruded logo in After Effects with Cinema 4D Lite


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!

Looking for the next Tutorial to watch?

Check out the Top 5 Features of Element 3D V2 for After Effects!

Learn about the new 3D Character Creator app, Adobe Fuse!

Learn about the Top 5 new features of Cinema 4D R17!

Learn the Top 5 After Effects Expressions!

Learn how to Recreate the Agengers: Age of Ultron 3D Title Animation!

See how to Combine Element 3D with the new Saber Plug-in!

Learn about the Top 5 Hidden Features of Illustrator CC!

See how to bring Animated 3D Characters into Element 3D!

To check out new features added to Cinema 4D R16!

Check out the Top 5 Tips for Better Camera Animation in After Effects!

Create a 3D Logo in After Effects CC 2017 with the new Cinema 4D Renderer

With the release of Creative Cloud 2017, After Effects introduces yet another option to create 3D extrusions and 3D logos. As a quick alternative to jumping into Cinema 4D Lite and creating a full 3D logo and 3D scene, you can now create extrusions from shape layers right in After Effects CC 2017 using the new Cinema 4D Render engine. This new features lets you extrude shape layers and text, add materials, and create environment layers, without needing to leave After Effects. 

Check out more new features for Creative Cloud 2017

3D Titles in After Effects CC 2017 with the Cinema 4D Renderer

Live Text Templates in After Effects CC 2017 for Premiere Pro

To easily create 3D reflections in After Effects, check out these 360° Environment Map Products!


Want another way to work in 3D in After Effects? Check out these other tutorials

Create a 3D extruded logo in After Effects with Cinema 4D Lite

Use Element 3D V2 in After Effects to create a 3D Logo


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!

Looking for the next Tutorial to watch?

Check out the Top 5 Features of Element 3D V2 for After Effects!

Learn about the new 3D Character Creator app, Adobe Fuse!

Learn about the Top 5 new features of Cinema 4D R17!

Learn the Top 5 After Effects Expressions!

Learn how to Recreate the Agengers: Age of Ultron 3D Title Animation!

See how to Combine Element 3D with the new Saber Plug-in!

Learn about the Top 5 Hidden Features of Illustrator CC!

See how to bring Animated 3D Characters into Element 3D!

To check out new features added to Cinema 4D R16!

Check out the Top 5 Tips for Better Camera Animation in After Effects!

Create 3D Titles in After Effects CC 2017 with the Cinema 4D Renderer

After Effects CC 2017 introduces the new Cinema 4D renderer natively in After Effects, allowing you to create 3D extruded text and shape layers, without needing to leave After Effects. This new feature replaces the legacy ray-traced renderer, utilizing Cinema 4D to render 3D elements under the hood. This new system allows you to extrude vector & text assets, create basic 3D materials, and create environment layers to add to 3D reflections.


Check out more new features for Creative Cloud 2017

Create a 3D Logo in After Effects CC 2017 with the Cinema 4D Renderer

Live Text Templates in After Effects CC 2017 for Premiere Pro
 

To easily create 3D reflections in After Effects, check out these 360° Environment Map Products!


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!

Looking for the next Tutorial to watch?

Check out the Top 5 Features of Element 3D V2 for After Effects!

Learn about the new 3D Character Creator app, Adobe Fuse!

Learn about the Top 5 new features of Cinema 4D R17!

Learn the Top 5 After Effects Expressions!

Learn how to Recreate the Agengers: Age of Ultron 3D Title Animation!

See how to Combine Element 3D with the new Saber Plug-in!

Learn about the Top 5 Hidden Features of Illustrator CC!

See how to bring Animated 3D Characters into Element 3D!

To check out new features added to Cinema 4D R16!

Check out the Top 5 Tips for Better Camera Animation in After Effects!

Photoshop 3D Image Based Lighting - Using 360 Photos to light 3D scenes in Photoshop

When working in the 3D workspace in Adobe Photoshop, one of the key workflows to get a nice looking render is the use of Image Based Lighting. With image-based-lighting, or IBL, you can use a 360 Environment Map photo to light your scene, and show up in the reflections of your 3D objects.

In this tutorial, I go over how to set up IBL in the 3D workspace, using one of the photos from 360° Environment Maps Pro. You can create Environment Map photos using your phone, or be sure to check out the bundles in the online store where you can pick up affordable packs of up to 115 Environment Maps that can be used for Image Based Lighting in Photoshop, After Effects, and Cinema 4D.


Want to get 8K Environment Maps for Photoshop?

Check out 360° Environment Maps Pro, compatible with Photoshop


How to use Cinema 4D Object Buffers to create Masks and Track Mattes for Post-Production

Using Object Buffers in Cinema 4D makes it easy to create masks and track mattes for individual objects. Haven't heard of object buffers? What you can do is use the Compositing Tag to assign an object buffer to individual 3D objects, then when you render out a multi-pass render, you'll also render out a black and white version of the frame, with the selected object in white.

What's the point of that? Well, you can use this as a selection in Photoshop or as a Track Matte in After Effects. This way, you can add adjustments to individual elements of an animation wihtout needing to rotoscope or mask out the object. This can also be a huge time saver if you need to make an adjustment after you've already rendered the project.

An example of a 3D Render, rendered out as a PNG sequence from Cinema 4D

An example of a 3D Render, rendered out as a PNG sequence from Cinema 4D

A corresponding Multi-Pass render with an Object Buffer set to the word "object"

A corresponding Multi-Pass render with an Object Buffer set to the word "object"


Want to greatly improve your 3D Renders?

Check out 360° Environment Maps Pro for Cinema 4D

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Create 3D effects in Adobe illustrator using the 3D Tools

By using the 3D tools in Adobe illustrator, you can create some pretty cool 3D effects without needing to jump into a full 3D app like Cinema 4D. If you want to create a vector version of an extruded logo or text, tilt an illustration in 3D, or create a cool revolving effect, you can do that all right inside of illustrator using the 3D effects found right inside of illustrator. Check out the video above to learn some quick tips and tricks on how to use the 3D effects in Adobe illustrator to create some great 3D vector artwork.


Want more info on New Features in Creative Cloud 2015? Learn more about:

• New Layer Styles in Photoshop CC 2015

• Quick Export to PNG and updates to Save for Web

• New 3D Filter to create bump maps and normal maps for 3D

• Working with Creative Cloud Libraries in Photoshop and other Adobe Apps

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Cinema 4D Dynamics Simulation Tips & Tricks

Setting up Dynamics Simulations in Cinema 4D is one of the most fun things you can do with 3D animation. By creating Dynamics Simulations, you can use gravity, force, and physics to have objects move and interact in realistic ways without having to add any keyframes. Getting Dynamics set up is simple enough if you only have one or two objects, but things can get a little more complex if you have cloners, hierarchies of objects, or complex geometry. In this Cinema 4D tutorial, I go over lots of tips and tricks for working with dynamics, including tips on both rigid body and soft body settings.

Want the project files used in this tutorial? You can get them in the store for only $1!

Want to learn more about Dynamics in Cinema 4D? Check out another tutorial on combining dynamics with mograph cloners to create an exploding brick wall.

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Recreate the X-Men Apocalpyse 3D titles in After Effects with Element 3D

There have been a lot of nice 3D titles in movie trailers lately, so for this week's tutorial I decided to tackle recreating the 3D titles seen in X-Men Apocalypse using After Effects and the 3D plug-in Element 3D. While the focus of this one is the 3D text, there are a lot of small details that go a long way that I'll get into in this one, including customizing the bevel, using custom mask layers for the "X-Men" text instead of just basic text, creating letter-by-letter text using the multi-object setting, and many more Element 3D tips and tricks!

Want to get the project file for this tutorial and other movie title tutorials? You can purchase it in the online store for just a couple dollars!

Don't have the patience to watch the full tutorial? Check out this time-lapse video of the title animation being created in After Effects:

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Want to see more movie title tutorials? Check out the next one on how to recreate the 3D titles for Star Trek Beyond in After Effects

Tips on Recreating "The Nice Guys" Movie Logo using the Blend Tool in Adobe Illustrator

I noticed the logo for the new film "The Nice Guys" in the movie trailer for the film and on posters that I started seeing around town, and was instantly a fan of the illustration. It is a movie logo that works well both in animation and print materials, on dark or light colors, and can be executed in one solid color; all staples of a great identity mark. Whenever I see really nice, geometrically even logo designs, I am always thinking about how some of the math could be automated in Adobe illustrator, without having to eyeball distances, line thicknesses, and other details, and without pulling up the calculator app.

This got me thinking about Adobe illustrator's blend tool, a favorite tool of mine but one that is often overlooked. With the blend tool, you can interpolate shapes, colors, line thickness, and more. 

adobe-illustrator-blend-tool-specific-steps

By using this technique on rounded arcs and lines, you can interpolate both the spacing of the intermediate lines, and the color gradation. You could even use Adobe illustrator's blend tool to interpolate the thickness between different lines. This makes recreating a lot of the letters like the "n" "c" and even the outlines between the "g" much easier. The great part is that the original elements are still editable, and the blended steps will automatically update if you make changes.

adobe-illustrator-blended-outlines

While I love my illustrator technical tips, I did not come up with the Nice Guys logo, and I completely back the idea that coming up with a great logo is MUCH more than the technical side of executing it. But once you have an idea and get to the execution phase, these Adobe illustrator tips can help greatly with your geometry straight! I haven't figured out yet who created the original logo, but if you know, let me know in the comments and I'll link to them for credit!

Want more info on New Features of Creative Cloud 2015? Learn more about:

• New Layer Styles in Photoshop CC 2015

• Quick Export to PNG and updates to Save for Web

• New 3D Filter to create bump maps and normal maps for 3D

• Working with Creative Cloud Libraries in Photoshop and other Adobe Apps


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Game of Throne VFX Tutorial - Emulate the Blue Tint Film Look

An iconic look to the scenes in Game of Thrones taking place in Winterfell or involving the nights watch is the blue tint look. Using Adobe After Effects and the Lumetri color grading effect, you can recreate this stylized film look. In addition to the film look, you can also recreate the CG snow look in After Effects using Trapcode Particular.

Want to get the project file for this tutorial? You can purchase it in the online store for just a couple dollars!

To learn more about recreating the CG snow, check out the other part of this tutorial:

Game Of Thrones VFX Tutorial - Recreate CG Snow


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Game of Thrones VFX Tutorial - Recreate CG Snow

A very powerful use of Trapcode Particular in After Effects is recreating volumetric, believable snow and snowstorms. This technique is frequently seen in Game of Thrones, when the scenes are taking place in Winterfell or involving the night's watch. In this tutorial, learn how to quickly recreate the CG snow look in a close-up shot using Trapcode Particular 2.5. This tutorial also covers new updates for Particular 2.5.

Want to get the project file for this tutorial? You can purchase it in the online store for just a couple dollars!

In addition to the CG snow, recreating this look involves creating the blue tint color grade. To learn about how to do that using the Lumetri Effect in After Effects, check out the other part of this tutorial here:

Game Of Throne VFX Tutorial - Emulate The Blue Tint Film Look


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


How to use Photoshop to edit the materials of 3D Characters created in Adobe Fuse

After you've assembled a 3D character in Adobe Fuse, then worked on customizing the character, and added clothing to your character, you can also edit and customize the Materials once you bring the 3D character into Photoshop. By customizing the textures, you can adjust materials found on the clothing, as well as swap out the textures, change the colors, and more. If you want to completely customize an existing material, you can dig into the asset folder of Adobe Fuse and open up an image materials in Photoshop CC.

Adobe Fuse is a new 3D character creator app, part of Adobe Creative Cloud. With it you can build out a custom 3D character using an intelligent UI, and then either bring your newly created character into Photoshop CC, or upload it to Mixamo's where you can add MoCap data and Download workable 3D files in a variety of formats.

Want to get a more in-depth look at Adobe Fuse

Learn what Adobe Fuse is, and how to bring Characters from Fuse into Photoshop CC

Learn how to bring Adobe Fuse Characters in Cinema 4D

Take a closer look at how to Assemble a Character

Learn how to Customize and Model a 3D Character in Fuse

See how you can add and Edit Clothing in Adobe Fuse


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Create Letter-by-Letter Text Animations in Cinema 4D using MoGraph, MoText, and Effectors

In Cinema 4D, you can use MoGraph and Effectors to do all sorts of cool animation. The MoGraph and Cloner system is one of the biggest unique features of working in Cinema 4D. In this 3D Animation tutorial, I go over how to use MoGraph Effectors on MoText objects, in order to create letter-by-letter Text animations. I've gotten a couple questions lately on how I put together the intro sequence for my Tutorials, and this tutorial gets into just that!

This tutorial covers the process of applying MoGraph Effectors to MoText, as well as setting up the Effector Properties, animating strength, and adjusting and animating the falloff. Digging into the falloff settings for each Effector is really where you can push what you can do with MoGraph Effectors and create modular, re-useable animation systems.

To learn about setting up the custom materials on the Text Caps, check out this tutorial.

Be sure to also learn about the second part of this process of linking Optical Flares to Cinema 4D Animations in After Effects using Cineware.

To set up the letter-by-letter animation, first go to MoGraph > Effector, and choose an effector. If you do this with the MoText selected in Cinema 4D, it will automatically be applied to the letters of the text.

Look at alllll those fancy effectors.

Look at alllll those fancy effectors.

If you added the Effector to the scene without the MoText object selected, you can grab the Effector and drag it into "Letters."

On the Effector under "Parameters," you can adjust position, scale, and rotation. This will adjust the properties of each letter individually. If you want to adjust the scale uniformly, be sure to check "uniform scale."

I don't even want to know what happens if you don't check "uniform scale." I wouldn't chance it.

I don't even want to know what happens if you don't check "uniform scale." I wouldn't chance it.

After adjusting Parameters, if you go to the Effector Tab, you can animate the strength on and off. You can also go beyond 100%, or below 0% to create overshoot and follow through.

Ohhhh, so that's why we're doing all this.

Ohhhh, so that's why we're doing all this.

Adjusting the strength is great and all, but animating the falloff in the Falloff Tab is when things really get interesting. If you go to the Falloff Tab and change it from Infinite to Sphere, you can then move, scale, and just the shape of the falloff to create the animation. Now you don't even need to bother with the strength!

You can animate with a Torus, but now we're just getting crazy.

You can animate with a Torus, but now we're just getting crazy.

Check it out from different views. Taking a look from the top, you can see how moving and scaling the falloff affects groups of letters. Because the falloff is gradual, the letters will smoothly animate as you move and scale the falloff. 

Now we're definitely in the Matrix. 

Now we're definitely in the Matrix. 

Here's where the magic happens. If you invert the falloff by checking the invert button, now you can animate the sphere from out of frame onto the letters, and they will sequentially animate. 

There's always one tiny checkbox that makes all the difference!

There's always one tiny checkbox that makes all the difference!

If you change scale to a value of -1, the letters will also scale into existence. 

Check out this awesome screenshot where you can't see anything.

Check out this awesome screenshot where you can't see anything.

To create the animation, you can set a keyframe on the Position Coordinates with the spherical falloff over to the left, and 30 or 45 frames later set another keyframe with the falloff covering the letters.

Now we're talking, animation time!

Now we're talking, animation time!

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Import a Maya 3D Object into Element 3D V2 as an OBJ Model

If you are working with Element 3D V2 in After Effects for your 3D workflow, you might want to bring in a 3D object built in Maya. To do this, you first need to export the Maya scene as an OBJ model. Simple enough, right? That'll only bring the Maya object into Element 3D as one big object with the same texture. Great if you just want to slap one material on an object and move a 3D After Effects camera around it, but not great if you want assign different materials to different parts of the 3D object, or want to animate individual parts separately.

If you want to have different materials on different parts of the object, you'll have to do some additional set-up work in Maya to assign different materials to different parts of the object. This way, Element 3D will read the different materials as markers for different parts of the object. You can then assign new materials to each part of the 3D model in Element 3D. By doing this, with a new feature of Element 3D V2, you can also create animation on each individual piece by using Auxiliary or AUX Channels. To learn how to import 3D objects from Maya into Element 3D V2, check out the video above.

New to Element 3D? 

Start with How to create a 3D Logo with Shadows & Reflections!

Learn about the Top new Features of Element 3D V2!

Learn about how to use Cinema 4D Animations in Element 3D V2 in this video

And my shortcut tips and tricks for Element 3D V2 in this video!

Want to Motion Track a 3D Object using Element 3D? Learn how in this video!


For a step-by-step breakdown of the process of bringing a Maya 3D Object into Element 3D V2, you first need to turn on OBJ export in the Maya plug-ins manager, which is in Windows > Settings/Preferences > Plug-ins Manager. You then want to scroll down and check on "OBJexport.Bundle"

Check 'em both on and hit REFRESH!

Check 'em both on and hit REFRESH!

The next step is to export the Maya 3D Object as an OBJ, by going to File > Export all, and making sure you select "OBJexport" from the "Files of Type" drop-down.

Don't forget to change it to OBJ!

Don't forget to change it to OBJ!

Next, back in After Effects, within the scene settings for Element 3D V2, you'll want to hit the Import button and locate the OBJ Model.

That is one slick chair.

That is one slick chair.

This will bring in the 3D object as one big object and material. If you want to be able to assign different Element 3D V2 Materials to different parts of the object, you'll have to jump back over to Maya and do a bit of additional work. To allow Element 3D to read different parts of the 3D OBJ model as different materials, all you need to do is assign a new material to each piece of the object, by right clicking and selecting "Assign New Material."

Right-click like a champ.

Right-click like a champ.

It doesn't matter what color the material is, just that each part is a different material. I usually throw on a bunch of bright colors in Maya for reference, and end  with a crazy rainbow colored 3D Model in Maya that looks something like this:

Wow, that is colorful!

Wow, that is colorful!

This way, when you bring the 3D Object back into Element 3D V2 as an OBJ Model, each piece will be separate. This will allow you to assign new materials to each piece.

Colorful and shiny, and now usable in Element 3D!

Colorful and shiny, and now usable in Element 3D!

This process can also be used to animate each piece separately, by creating a duplicate of just one piece, and assigning it to an Auxiliary or AUX Channel. This setting is new to Element 3D V2, so be sure to update!

That is so many channels!

That is so many channels!

Then, after you've assigned different pieces to different AUX channels, you can animate position, scale, and rotation separately on the Element 3D effect, under Group > Aux Channels. This new system of groups with Aux channels massively grows the type of specific animation you can do in Element 3D V2.

So many animation possibilities!

So many animation possibilities!


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


Create a 3D write-on Animation by combining Element 3D with the new Saber plug-in

In my previous After Effects tutorial, I talked about how to Combine the new Saber plug-in with Element 3D text layers. In this new tutorial, I wanted to take that a bit further, and get into how to use saber to drive the animation of an Element 3D layer, to create a cool glowing write-on effect. I'm always trying to build everything as clean as possible, so we'll talk about how to create this full animation using only one set of keyframes.

New to Element 3D? 

Start with How to create a 3D Logo with Shadows & Reflections!

Learn about the Top new Features of Element 3D V2!

Learn about how to use Cinema 4D Animations in Element 3D V2 in this video

And my shortcut tips and tricks for Element 3D V2 in this video!

Want to Motion Track a 3D Object using Element 3D? Learn how in this video!


Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!


How to Extract Elements from Footage with the RotoBrush & Refine Edge Tool in After Effects CC

Sometimes you want to composite elements into the background of a shot, but a character is in the foreground, and you need the VFX elements to go between the character and the background. Or you have a really tricky shot where you need to isolate and extract one element from a shot, but didn't have a green screen handy.

Using the RotoBrush and Refine Edge tool in After Effects CC, you can mask out elements of a shot over time. Frame-by-frame masking and rotoscoping you say? Not in my workflow, grandpa! The rotobrush lets you quickly paint the element that you want to retain, and After Effects will use this data over time to handle the movement. The more information you give the RotoBrush tool the better, but it'll still be much faster than the painful process of frame-by-frame roto work. With the Refine Edge Tool, new to After Effects CC, you can now adjust the edges of the element even further, to account for tricky shots like hair.

Looking for more After Effects Tracking, Compositing, and Visual Effects Tutorials?

Learn about working with the After Effects 2D Tracker

Check out how to track Matte Paintings using the 3D Camera Tracker

Learn How to Track & Composite a 3D Object in Cinema 4D & After Effects


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How to Recreate the "Mad Max: Fury Road" Title Sequence in After Effects

I think the design and animation for the titles using to promote Mad Max: Fury Road fit perfectly with the grittiness and edge of the film. The textures work nicely, and there is some really nice details with the blood particles animating inside the letters as the camera pulls closer. For this video, I wanted to see how closely I could recreate it using After Effects, and some Trapcode Particular Tricks for the blood and dust animating inside the letters.

This also includes working in Adobe After Effects CC 2015, and creating 3D particle effects to recreate the Mad Max Title.

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Want a quick idea of what this tutorial is all about? Check out a time lapse video of this project:

Like this tutorial? Consider becoming a Patron at Patreon.com/SeanFrangella to get additional benefits such as project files and more! 

To get weekly Motion Graphics, VFX, and 3D animation tutorials be sure to subscribe to the show on YouTube!